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Sno-Isle Libraries closed Nov. 27, open on Nov. 28

Originally published Nov. 20, 2014

Sno-Isle Libraries will be closed on Thursday, Nov. 27 for Thanksgiving Day. All libraries will resume with their regular hours on Friday, Nov. 28. See locations & hours.



Entertainer to share tips for reading, singing with grandkids

Originally published Nov. 13, 2014

Singer-songwriter Nancy Stewart will present a "Read & Sing With Your Grandkids" program at five community libraries.

The events will take place at: Lynnwood Library, 4 p.m. Nov. 21, 19200 44th Ave. West; Brier Library, 5:30 p.m. Dec. 2, 23303 Brier Rd.; Mountlake Terrace Library, 6:30 p.m. Dec. 3, 23300 58th Ave. West; Snohomish Library, 7 p.m. Dec. 4, 311 Maple Ave.; and Mukilteo Library, 4:30 p.m. Dec. 12, 4675 Harbour Pointe Blvd.  

Grandparents are invited to brush up on their nursery rhymes, songs, favorite picture books. Stewart will review the pros and cons of technology for young children and provide the latest information on why reading and singing to little ones is more important than ever.

Stewart is an award-winning entertainer and grandparent from Mercer Island. Her Sing With Our Kids Project promotes early learning through community singing. 

"Nancy has a passion for early literacy and transmits her knowledge in an interesting, approachable manner," said Kristin Piepho, children’s services coordinator for Sno-Isle Libraries. “She enchants children with her songs and activities.”

 



Tween programs combine science, art and more

Originally published Nov. 12, 2014

Sno-Isle Libraries is partnering with the Pacific Science Center to bring exciting, thought-provoking programming to tweens and young teens. Through collaborative learning and mentoring experiences, the Tween STEAM Club programs are designed for youth to develop a passion for science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM).

“Our goal is to get tweens excited about science and show them that a career in a STEAM field is a real possibility in their future. Plus, they will explore ways to feed their natural curiosity by learning about the many resources available through our libraries,” said Dawn Rutherford, teen services coordinator for Sno-Isle Libraries.

The Tween STEAM Club’s hands-on science fun for tweens age nine to 13 or in fourth to eighth grade consists of programs made up of a series of four 90-minute sessions with different activities each time. Attendance at all four sessions is recommended, but not required.

The Pacific Science Center's Science After-School workshops will take place in Darrington, Lake Stevens, Monroe, Oak Harbor, Lynnwood and Mountlake Terrace. They are scheduled as follows:

Physics FUNdamentals: Learn about physics concepts including Newton's laws of motion, acceleration, electricity and simple machines, through a range of projects and activities, including solar ovens and catapults. Darrington Library, Wednesdays, 12:30 – 2 p.m., Nov. 19, Dec. 3, 10, 17.

Forensics 101: Acquire the scientific skills needed to solve crimes. Lessons focus on fingerprints, codes, handwriting, chromatography, fiber analysis, and DNA evidence. Lake Stevens Library, Fridays, 3 – 4:30 p.m., Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 12, 19; Monroe Library, Mondays, 4 – 5:30 p.m., Nov. 24, Dec. 1, 8, 15; Oak Harbor Library, Sundays, 2 – 3:30 p.m., Nov. 23, 30, Dec. 7, 21.

Ooze & Ahs: Experiment with liquids, solids and gases, make your own slime, and learn how to paint with acids and bases. Lynnwood Library, Thursdays, 6 – 7:30 p.m., Dec. 4, 11, 18, and Monday, Dec. 15; Mountlake Terrace Library, Tuesdays, 4 – 5:30 p.m., Nov. 18, Dec. 9, 16, 23.

Space is limited, so pre-registration is encouraged online at sno-isle.org/events or by calling the library. For contact and location information, visit sno-isle.org/locations.



Sno-Isle partnership brings Safe Place to 15 libraries

Originally published Nov. 5, 2014

Sno-Isle Libraries is joining Everett Transit, Workforce Development Center, and Everett Libraries to team up with Cocoon House, adding 15 new Safe Place sites around Snohomish County.

Safe Place is a program that partners with other organizations in the community to offer youth ages 12-17 quick access to safety and services.

When a youth sees the Safe Place logo on a Sno-Isle library building, he or she will know it’s a safe place to ask for help. Personnel at these locations are trained to keep the youth safe while Cocoon House is contacted.

Cocoon House staff then arrive at the location 24/7 within 45 minutes to provide help or transportation to a safe shelter.

This partnership allows the community to assist a youth in crisis quickly in getting home safely, getting them to Cocoon House shelters, or connecting them with other needed services.

Read the full article in the Edmonds Beacon.



Stanwood voters approve annexation into Sno-Isle Libraries district

Originally published Nov. 5, 2014

Stanwood voters have approved annexing the city's library into the Sno-Isle Libraries district.  

The annexation, approved by 79 percent of voters, will take effect on Jan. 1, 2016. Snohomish County election results confirmed that 100 percent of votes had been counted by Tuesday night.

“Stanwood voters have expressed their strong support for continuing library service in our community,” says Leonard Kelley, Mayor of Stanwood. “The vote to annex into the regional library district means that, after 2015, the city will no longer pay a contract fee for Sno-Isle Libraries service at the Stanwood Library. Those city funds will be freed up to support other needed city services such as police, fire and public works.”

“We certainly appreciate the strong response from the voters,” says Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory, Executive Director of Sno-Isle Libraries. “The 79 percent  approval ensures a stable funding base for library operations and enables Sno-Isle Libraries to continue to provide library services, resources, events and materials to meet the needs of the community.”

The estimated cost of library annexation to the owner of a Stanwood property assessed at $250,000 will be $125 per year. The estimate is based upon a rate of 50 cents per $1,000 assessed property value.

 



Sno-Isle Libraries Closed Nov. 11

Originally published Nov. 4, 2014

Sno-Isle Libraries will be closed on Tuesday, Nov. 11 for Veterans Day. All libraries will resume with their regular hours on Wednesday, Nov. 12. See locations & hours.



Marysville Library helper honored as Volunteer of the Month

Originally published Oct. 30, 2014

Congratulations to Marysville Library volunteer Patrick McGourty for being recognized by Mayor Nehring and the City Council as the city’s Volunteer of the Month. Patrick has given over 1,000 hours of his time in support to the library and we are thrilled that he has been selected for this recognition. Please congratulate him as you see him around the library.

“For his outstanding community service through volunteering his time weekly at the Marysville Library, and his exemplary support of library staff and patrons toward ensuring a positive and valuable experience at the library, we’re happy to recognize Patrick for his contributions,” said Mayor Jon Nehring at a presentation during the Oct. 27 City Council meeting.

Read the full news release from the City of Marysville.



Get recommended reads from Nancy Pearl Nov. 5

Originally published Oct. 28, 2014

Nancy Pearl, Seattle's most famous librarian, makes a return appearance to the Whidbey Island Center for the Arts to share her passion for reading and recommend books that will make great gifts. The free event will start at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 5. Doors will open at 10:30 a.m. for cookies and conversation.

Whidbey Island Center for the Arts is located at 565 Camano Ave. in Langley. The event is funded by the Friends of the Langley Library.

The New York Times calls Pearl “the talk of librarian circles.” Acclaimed author of the “Book Lust” and “Book Crush” series and model for the Archie McPhee Librarian Action Figure, she has been popular with Sno-Isle Libraries audiences for years. Former librarian and bookseller in Detroit, Tulsa, and Seattle, Pearl is a nationally known speaker. She is a regular commentator on National Public Radio and, through her “Book Lust Forever” podcast, helps to answer the question, “What should I read next?”  



'Authors Next-Door' events celebrate reading and community

Originally published Oct. 27, 2014

More than 35 authors from Snohomish and Island counties will make appearances at five “Authors Next-Door” events at Sno-Isle Libraries in November.

In a celebration of reading and community, library customers will have the chance to engage with the panels of published authors who represent a diverse range of genres from children’s picture books to adult fiction and non-fiction. Books will be available for signing and purchase. The events will take place at the Snohomish, Coupeville, Freeland, Mukilteo and Stanwood libraries. They are free and open to the public.

See the list of authors, event dates, and read the full news release.



The Herald: Stanwood city seeks library annexation

Originally published Oct. 20, 2014


Stanwood residents vote on annexation to library district

Originally published Oct. 15, 2014

For Stanwood voters, the Nov. 4 general election includes a ballot measure that asks voters to consider annexing the city's library into the Sno-Isle Libraries district.  Stanwood Library

The annexation, if approved by a simple majority of voters, would take effect on Jan. 1, 2016.

By annexing, the city would no longer pay a contract fee for Stanwood Library service. That would free up city funds to support other town services such as police, fire and public works.

The estimated cost of library annexation to the owner of a Stanwood property assessed at $250,000 would be $125 per year. The estimate is based upon a rate of 50 cents per $1,000 assessed property value.

More information is available at sno-isle.org/locations/stanwood-annexation.
 



Oak Harbor Library to host reading of 'short, crazy' Vietnam memoir Nov. 6

Originally published Oct. 13, 2014

A Northwest veteran’s unusual illustrated memoir, “Boocoo Dinky Dow: My short, crazy Vietnam War,” will be the subject of a Nov. 6 reading at the Oak Harbor Library.

Julie Titone will read and share art from the book, which she co-authored with the late artist Grady Myers, at 2 p.m. at the library, 1000 SE Regatta Drive. Joining in reading from the book will be U.S. Army veteran Ray Heltsley of Coupeville, a Skagit Valley College instructor who served in Vietnam in 1969-70, one year after Myers.

The event is free and open to the public. Veterans and their families are especially encouraged to attend.

The book takes its title from soldiers’ slang pronunciation of “beaucoup dien cai dau,” meaning very crazy. A Vietnam Veterans of America review hailed it as Lucid ... well-told ... beautifully illustrated ... infused with humor.”  Washington State Magazine praised it as "Part ‘M*A*S*H’ and part ‘Full Metal Jacket.’ ”

Myers was an aimless Idaho teenager, when, desperate for troops, the U.S. Army overlooked his extreme nearsightedness and transformed him into Hoss, an M-60 machine gunner. In “Boocoo Dinky Dow”he recounts his military initiation at Fort Lewis, Wash. He describes the intensity of Vietnam, where an old man carrying a bundle of sticks posed a moral dilemma and where his brave but explosives-happy comrades in Charlie Company sometimes posed the greatest danger.

Myers returned from four months in Vietnam with serious injuries and a Purple Heart. He went on to a professional art career in Idaho and Washington. He died in Boise in 2011.

Titone, who was married to Myers in the 1980s, is communications and marketing manager for Sno-Isle Libraries. She lives in Everett. Her writing and photography have appeared in regional, national and international publications; her essays have been published in three college textbooks and two literary collections. Her novel, Deadline Affairs, was recorded by Books in Motion.

More information is available at shortcrazyvietnam.com.

 



Health forum will encourage planning for crisis care

Originally published Oct. 1, 2014

(Revised Oct. 9, 2014, to reflect a change in the panelist lineup.)

Debilitating health problems can strike at any age. That fact of life will be the focus of an Oct. 22 forum, “Don’t Wait for a Crisis: Health Care, Your Way,” to be held at the Edmonds Center for Arts at 6 p.m.

The event, part of the Sno-Isle Libraries Issues That Matter series, is free and open to the public. It is being held in conjunction with the Snohomish County Health Leadership Coalition’s community initiative to promote advance care planning.

Experts at the forum will explain how people can ensure that they get the health care they want, even when they are unable to speak for themselves. They are:

  • Dr. Joanne Roberts, Chief Medical Officer, Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett
  • Scott Forslund, Director, Snohomish County Health Leadership Coalition
  • Reverend Eileen Hanson, Pastor, Trinity Lutheran Church

They will be joined by Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory, executive director of Sno-Isle Libraries, who will relate her family’s experiences. Moderator will be Ed Bremer, news and public affairs director for KSER-FM community radio.

For those unable to attend, the event will be live-streamed, viewable online at sno-isle.org and staff will be live tweeting during the event using hashtag #snoisleITM. More information and a list of library resources on the subject are available at sno-isle.org/issues-that-matter.

Sno-Isle Libraries' Issues That Matter programs, held in partnership with KSER-FM and the Daily Herald, are meant to encourage community conversations on high-profile topics. Funding is provided by the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation



Authors of 'Practicing Journalism' will speak at Edmonds Library

Originally published Sep. 30, 2014

Paul Steinle and Sara Brown, authors of “Practicing Journalism: The Power and Purpose of the Fourth Estate,” will speak at 7 p.m. Oct. 7 in the Plaza Room of Edmonds Library, 650 Main St.

The event is sponsored by Sno-Isle Libraries, the Daily Herald and Edmonds Book Shop.

“Practicing Journalism” is about the varied reasons that journalists remain dedicated to reporting news, even as the media and newspapers in particular are under siege. Using profiles and first-person interviews with 91 American journalists, the book showcases the dedication of reporters, editors and publishers in their communities. It explores journalistic values in the digital age — digging deep, influencing change, serving communities, challenging authorities, and embracing empathy.

Steinle is a veteran journalist and news media manager who has been teaching journalism since 1991. Sara Brown has over 30 years of experience as a human resource professional, management trainer, columnist and educator in the newspaper business. They are founders of the nonprofit organization Valid Sources and launched the Who Needs Newspapers? Project.



Sno-Isle Libraries invites you to toast sustainability at 'Green Drinks'

Originally published Sep. 30, 2014

Green Drinks, a monthly social gathering that focuses on sustainability, will be hosted by the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation on Oct. 8. The reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Sno-Isle Libraries Service Center, 7312 35th Ave NE, Marysville.

The public is invited to the reception. Guests will hear about the library district’s sustainability efforts, which include special attention to energy savings and health of customers and staff. Service Master, Sno-Isle’s custodial partners, will describe the Green Seal GS-42 Certified program used in library buildings throughout Snohomish and Island counties.

Co-host for the event is the Sierra Club, Washington Chapter - Snohomish Group. 

Guests will also be offered a “behind the scenes” tour of the Service Center, where staff members select, order, process and deliver tens of thousands of books, CDs and DVDs annually.

Green Drinks is a monthly social gathering of people who discuss the sustainable things that they, or their organizations, are involved in. Each meeting includes a “Toast to our Beautiful Blue Planet While We Figure Ways to Not Toast Our Beautiful Blue Planet.” Green Drinks began in London in 1989 and has spread world-wide. Snohomish County Green Drinks has been networking for five years. 



Whidbey Island candidate forums set for Freeland, Oak Harbor

Originally published Sep. 30, 2014

Candidates running for office in November will answer questions presented by the League of Women Voters of Whidbey Island at two upcoming forums sponsored by the League and Sno-Isle Libraries. State ballot initiatives will also be discussed.

In Freeland, a forum will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Oct. 8 at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 20103 State Route 525. Candidates for the following offices have been invited to participate: Island County treasurer, Island County District No. 3 commissioner, 10th District state representative.  

In Oak Harbor, an Oct. 16 forum will held from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St. Candidates for the following offices have been invited to participate: Island County treasurer, Island County District No. 3 commissioner, 10th District state representative, and U.S. 2nd Congressional District.



Four spine-tingling mystery authors head for Coupeville Library

Originally published Sep. 29, 2014

COUPEVILLE, Wash.  —  It would It be a crime for mystery lovers to miss Monday afternoons at the Coupeville Library in October. The library will host a different author each week.

“From cozy and funny to gritty and terrifying, there’s something for every mystery fan,” said Marie Byars of the Coupeville Library staff.

The award-winning guest authors and dates are:

  • Bernadette Pajer, Oct. 6 at 1:30 p.m. Pajer is author of the Professor Bradshaw mysteries. The charming Bradshaw lives in turn-of-the-20th Century Seattle, and travels around the Pacific Northwest. He’s a single parent, teaches at the University of Washington, and has a special affinity for the new-fangled science and application of electricity.
  • William Dietrich, Oct. 13 at 1:30 p.m. Dietrich fans thrill to the exploits of Ethan Gage: Napoleonic-era adventurer, speculator, crusader, swashbuckler, and so much more. Dietrich also writes stand-alone thrillers with a historical bent; “Blood of the Reich” weaves a story between Nazi Germany and present-day Seattle.
  • Owen Laukkanen, Oct. 20 at 1:30 p.m. Black and white. Good and evil. Can right and wrong be so clearly defined? Laukkanen’s Stevens & Windermere mysteries take a gritty look at both sides of the coin, and readers may not be sure whose side they’re on until the last page. 
  • Candace Robb,  Oct. 27 at 1:30 p.m. Robb is an historian and author of the Owen Archer mystery series. The books are set in medieval York; Archer is a spy for the Archbishop When trouble is afoot, Archer is dispatched to bring the matter to a speedy conclusion. Robb also writes historical fiction under the penname Emma Campion.



Edmonds Library explores movie mashups with critic Robert Horton

Originally published Sep. 26, 2014

EDMONDS, Wash. — The Edmonds Library will host film critic Robert Horton’s presentation “The Movie Mashup: Wild Literary Adaptations on Film” on Friday, Oct. 3 at 7 p.m.

The free event will explore how filmmakers who go crazy with their source material can creates something fresh and exciting. How did "The Tempest" become "Forbidden Planet?" How did "Jane Eyre" turn into "I Walked with a Zombie?" And how on earth did the Coen Brothers take Homer’s "Odyssey" and come up with "O Brother, Where Art Thou?"

Horton will explain how a wild adaptation can not only illuminate the original (even when we barely recognize it), but also teach audiences to be open to the unexpected. And he will speak about how different cultures adapt classic films for their own purposes.

Horton has spent more than 30 years writing and talking about film. A graduate of the University of Washington, he reviews movies for The Herald in Everett and KUOW-FM in Seattle, as well as a number of national publications.

This program is funded by the Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau.

 

 



Marysville School District’s $1.3 million grant includes Marysville Library

Originally published Sep. 26, 2014

The Marysville Library is among five partners joining forces with the Marysville School District to help struggling students, thanks to a $1.3 million grant. The 21st Century Community Learning Center Grant was awarded to the school district in collaboration with the Washington Alliance for Better Schools (WABS). The funds will support after-school and summer programs for Quil Ceda Tulalip and Liberty Elementary schools.

“The Marysville Library’s participation in this partnership allows us to contribute to a program that addresses real needs identified by leaders in our community, while meeting our own strategic focus on literacy,” said Jill Wubbenhorst, assistant managing librarian of the Marysville Library. “We are excited to be part of a connected community providing enrichment activities for students to help them meet academic standards.”

The YMCA Snohomish County (Marysville Branch), Pacific Education Institute, the University of Washington Institute for Science, and the Geo-Literacy Alliance of Washington State are also participating partners.

Read the article in The Herald for more information.



Snohomish County Sheriff thanks Sno-Isle Libraries for Oso support

Originally published Sep. 26, 2014

Snohomish County Sheriff Ty Trenary has thanked Sno-Isle Libraries for the loan of two trucks that were used for storage of personal items recovered from the March 22 Oso landslide. The massive slide claimed the lives of 43 people and buried Highway 530.

In a letter to Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory, Trenary wrote that “hundreds of items belonging to victims of the SR 530 Slide have been recovered, cleaned and returned to family members of the victims and the significant impact of those items on the families cannot be overstated.”

The loan of the trucks was suggested by Jeanne Crisp, Sno-Isle Libraries director of technical services and facilities. 

“Like many others in the region, Sno-Isle staff wanted to help those affected by the landslide,” Crisp said. “Fortunately we were able to make two contributions: loaning two vehicles for the storage of recovered materials, and enhancing Internet service at our Darrington Library during the crisis. So many gave so much more.”  



There is not such a cradle of democracy upon the earth as the Free Public Library,
this republic of letters, where neither rank, office, nor wealth receives the slightest consideration.
- Andrew Carnegie


Sno-Isle Libraries Administrative & Service Center, 7312 35th Ave NE, Marysville, WA 98271-7417
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